Tuesday, 30 August 2011

Symbols 101 Part Two

In the previous part we discussed the importance of ensuring the symbols we choose actually communicate the information that we hope to impart. Is it obvious what the symbol means? If not can it be decoded by the child considering their level of understanding or do we need to teach the meaning of the symbol?

In this section I want to explore this further.

Symbols are just pictures. There I said it. There are no special magical properties about them, although sometimes when I talk to colleagues you might think otherwise. They are images that we use to help communicate meaning. Look at these three images.



They are all pictures of biscuits. One is a photograph; another is a drawing and the third a symbol from one of the common symbol sets.  Are any of them ‘better’ than the others? Think about a student in your class and choose which symbol would be the most appropriate for them. Every time I have asked this question in my training courses the responses are as varied as the delegates who come to them. Many choose the photograph stating that it is the least abstract and most representative of the real object. Others choose the drawing saying that it’s clear and easier to see. Some choose the symbol because that’s what they use in school and their students are already familiar with it, but they all choose something different depending on the needs of their students. And that is the point.

It really doesn't matter which picture you choose so long as your students can see it and understand what it means. Photographs, drawings and symbols are all appropriate so long as we all (staff and students) share an understanding of meaning behind them.


The most significant benefit of using a symbol set rather than ad-hoc pictures and photographs is the convenience they afford us. Symbol sets provide us with thousands of images each related to words and concepts all in one place. They usually come as part of an editing package which makes using them to create resources both quick and easy. Schools often choose a specific symbol package to meet their priorities, for example Boardmaker and PCS symbols to support communication, Symwriter and the Widget Literacy symbols to support early literacy or Makaton symbols which follow closely Makaton signing system. There are other symbol sets too each of which provide benefits to their users. Which you choose should reflect how you are going to use them. Some schools also decide a 'core' vocabulary and which symbols to use for each word to ensure consistency across school. 

Let’s have a quiz. Here’s a sentence taken from a symbol supported website. I've removed the words; see if you can decode the sentence.



How well did you do? Maybe it would help to give you a couple of other sentences which might give you a clue as the context of the sentence.


Are you any closer to working it out? Remember that the symbols were added to this site to make it easier for people to read and understand it. It won an award for it! Give up?



How many of the symbols did you just know? How many could you decode? Did any completely confuse you? The observant among you will also notice that two different symbols are used for the word ‘lots’ in the last sentence. I have no idea what that is about and it really only adds to the confusion.

The example above illustrates nicely the three different types of symbols. Let’s look again at the sentence and categorise them according to my results.

Symbols I just knew: ‘10’ for the number 10 (because I'm numerate) and ‘rain’ because I know that rain falls from clouds. I learned that in science.

Symbols I could work out: ‘in’, ‘over’. I did get ‘years’ but only because I know that there are 12 months in a year and the picture was a calendar, ‘metres’ because I know what a ruler is for and that the word ‘metre’ begins with the letter M. Oh and ‘wet’ although my first guess was ‘sweaty’.

The rest I had to look up as I didn’t know what they meant. Two exclamation marks for the word ‘very’ makes sense now but only because I understand the use of them in English grammar. Think of the skills and prior knowledge that was required to complete the exercise. Now imagine what one of your students might make of this sentence. Would they have the skills and background knowledge to decode the symbols and read the sentence?

Adding symbols, photographs or drawings to words doesn’t automatically add meaning to them. We need to think carefully about the sentences that we are constructing, add symbols to the words that convey information and choose those symbols wisely based on our knowledge of our student’s needs.

In the next part we’ll look at simplifying text and I’ll share some good practice in the use of symbols from schools around the country.


No comments:

Post a Comment